Cardiac & Vascular Physiology

Cardiovascular disease accounts for 160,000 deaths every year in the UK. Understanding the normal function of the cardiovascular system provides the basis for understanding pathological changes and exploring new avenues for treatment. This Theme encompasses all aspects of this vast research field from cellular to organ level and the integration of functions to produce appropriate cardiovascular responses.

Specialities in this Theme

CRACCardiovascular, respiratory & autonomic
CSCellular signalling
CPComparative physiology
EMTEpithelia & membrane transport
HCMHeart & cardiac muscle
HWHealth and wellbeing
HPHuman physiology
ICIon channels
MEPMicrovascular & endothelial physiology
MCMuscle contraction
RPRenal physiology
SMSmooth muscle
TETeaching

Theme Leads

Sarah Calaghan, Associate Professor of Cardiac Physiology, University of Leeds

I am an Associate Professor at the University of Leeds. My research focuses on the role of membrane microdomains (caveolae) in the function of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, and the impact on this of diseases like heart failure and drug treatment (e.g. statins). I’ve benefited from the activities of The Physiological Society, particularly the scientific meetings, since I was an early career scientist and I’m keen to contribute to the Society by acting as co-Theme Lead for the Cardiac & Vascular Theme.

 

Chris Garland, Professor of Vascular Pharmacology, University of Oxford

As a long term member of The Society, I was eager to take on the role of Theme Lead for Cardiac and Vascular Physiology, which has been my area of interest since my PhD studies in London. I am based in Oxford, where I am Professor of Vascular Pharmacology and Fellow and Tutor in Medicine and Biomedical Science at Magdalen College. My research addresses the interactions between vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells in the microcirculation.

 

Andrew James, Senior Lecturer, University of Bristol

I am one of three Theme Leads for the Cardiac and Vascular Physiology Theme. My research interests are in cardiac cellular physiology and the mechanisms underlying conditions such as heart failure and arrhythmias. Cardiovascular diseases remain a major cause of mortality, accounting for 160,000 deaths per year in the UK alone. This Theme encompasses all aspects of this vast research field from cellular to organ level and the integration of functions to produce appropriate cardiovascular responses. As Sarah Calaghan and I outlined in our article in the Spring 2018 edition of Physiology News (as leads to the previous Cardiac and Respiratory Physiology Theme), with increasing access to gene editing and super-resolution imaging technologies, now is an exciting time to be a physiologist.

Theme Lead Spotlight

Site search

Filter

Content Type

Sign up to our newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter