The Myth of a Sport Scientist

October 26, 2017

Back in school, I was a sporty student taking part in a plethora of activities from netball and hockey, to kayaking, tennis and 1500m, but I was never keen on becoming a professional athlete. I was always nominated for the sport day events and typically took charge as captain. When looking at my A-level choices and what career to follow, I naturally pursued the sport route, aligning with topics such as physical education and biology.

Then, when it came to higher education, studying sport science was at the top of my list. Whilst visiting institutional open days, and speaking to friends, family and teachers, it became apparent that there was a mismatch between the perceptions of what a sport scientist is about and what skills it entails. Here I present some top common misconceptions of being a sport scientist.

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Myth #1: You have to be an elite sportsperson

This is my pet hate and the main myth I try to debunk! It is not true that a sport scientist has to be good at sport; yes it can sometimes help to have an interest in physical activity, exercise or sport, but you don’t have be a Messi or Ronaldo. The whole benefit of studying sport science is that you can inspire anyone from the inactive to the elite. Studying sport science is more about being interested in the application of science to the interpretation and understanding of how the body responds to exercise. It involves expertise across a range of scientific disciplines including physiology, psychology, biomechanics, biochemistry, anatomy, and nutrition.

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Myth # 2: You are either a physical education teacher or a coach

Another persistent myth about being interested in sport and studying sport science is that you run around a rugby pitch with a whistle. As much as I respect the talents and skills of PE teachers and coaches, and although many of our students may go into these careers, these are not the only skills and applications of a sport scientist. Sport scientists can be performance analysts. Or they may specialise in exercise physiology. They may even go into marketing, rehabilitation, PR, sport media, or education. The diversity and depth of transferable skills means that there are a variety of options and directions to take, whether you want to help improve the health and wellbeing of a population through exercise plans or the recovery of injured athletes. I always had an interest in teaching sport or science. It was during my PhD that I became aware of the opportunities and careers in academia. Then, becoming a lecturer became my focus, combining my love of the subject and passion for the research!

Finally, Myth #3: It’s not a ‘real’ science

This final myth really bothers me, and is most applicable to the research aspect of my job. It can be frustrating when we are not as respected in the field of science, where some say it’s not a ‘real’ science’. Many of us who are in the field of sport science are specialised in a discipline. For me, it was exercise physiology and biochemistry.

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As an exercise physiologist, I am specifically interested in the relationship between the use of exercise as a stressor and how the body responds at a cellular level with specific use of biochemical and immunological analytical techniques. Just because we use models of sport performance, exercise bouts or physical activity sessions, doesn’t mean that there aren’t complex scientific skills, theories, analytics and techniques behind the work. My primary research focuses on how the immune system and metabolism help our skeletal muscles repair after physical activity, exercise, and training. My current research is about ultra-endurance running profiling of endurance performances, rehabilitation techniques for muscle damage and inflammation, and the use of exercise plans in management of diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

With the developments and interest in sport across the nation following events such as the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, and other events such as Wimbledon, the Football leagues and the Rugby World Cup, hopefully people are starting to realise how sport science can advance sport performance and health.


Dr Hannah Jayne Moir is a Senior Lecturer in Health & Exercise Prescription, at Kingston University, London. Her research is driven in the discipline of Sport & Exercise Sciences and she is co-chair and theme leader for the Sport, Exercise, Nutrition and Public Health Research Group.

This post is part of our Researcher Spotlight series. If you research, teach, do outreach, or do policy work in physiology, and would like to write on our blog, please get in touch with Julia at jturan@physoc.org.

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