• 07 Jul 2019
  • Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre, Aberdeen, UK

The placenta and maternal metabolic regulation in health and disease

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This satellite symposium, The placenta and maternal metabolic regulation in health and disease, explores the latest research into the biological significance of placental endocrine function in adapting maternal physiology during pregnancy to support fetal growth in both normal and compromised environments.

 

Symposium organisers

Luis Sobrevia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile
Raheela Khan, University of Nottingham, UK
Abigail Fowden, University of Cambridge, UK

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Sunday 7 July 2019

Registration and coffee

Welcome

Session 1

Chair: Luis Sobrevia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

09:30 Novel insights into the regulation of human placental function
Thomas Jansson, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, USA
10:05 Lipid homeostasis at the feto-placental interface
Gernot Desoye, Medical University of Graz, Austria

Refreshments and posters

Session 2

Chair: Raheela Khan, University of Nottingham, UK

11:15 Placental programming of maternal behaviour: Relevance to lifelong health
Rosalind John, Cardiff University, UK
11:50 Placental endocrine control of maternal metabolism and its importance for long term health
Amanda Sferruzzi-Perri, University of Cambridge, UK

Lunch and posters

Session 3

Chair: Luis Sobrevia, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

13:30 Placental aging and stillbirth
Roger Smith, The University of Newcastle (UON), Australia
14:05 Placental derived extracellular vesicles: indicators of normal and complicated pregnancies
Carolina Motta-Mejia, University of Oxford, UK
14:40 Placental-maternal immune modulation via extracellular vesicles
Beth Holder, Imperial College London, UK

Refreshments and posters

Session 4

Chair: Raheela Khan, University of Nottingham, UK

15:45 The impact of maternal vitamin D on the placental epigenome, transcriptome and proteome
Jane Cleal, University of Southampton, UK
16:20 Proteomic signatures of human placental vascular maturation
Michael Taggart, Newcastle University, UK

Drinks, posters and networking

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You must be registered for Physiology 2019 to register for the ‘Cellular mechanisms of anti-cancer induced cardiotoxicity’ satellite symposium. To register for Physiology 2019 click here.

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Travel

For information on travelling to Aberdeen, please see Visit Aberdeen.

Physiology 2019 will be hosted at the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre, Exhibition Ave, Bridge of Don, Aberdeen AB23 8BL. The AECC is the largest convention centre in northern Scotland, hosting 600 events and welcoming over 300,000 visitors each year.

AECC sits right next to the A90. It’s only a 15-minute taxi ride from Aberdeen railway and bus stations in the city centre.

By Bus

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Summary

During pregnancy many physiological changes occur in the mother, which are designed to support fetal growth and to sustain the baby during lactation. These include changes in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, immune and metabolic systems. A failure to appropriately adapt maternal physiology can lead to pregnancy complications, including abnormal birth weight, preeclampsia, and gestational diabetes, which can be traced to poor placental development in early pregnancy. The placenta is the place for the bidirectional materno-fetal crosstalk involving transfer of metabolic substrates and epigenetic regulation about which little is known. Amino acids, lipids, glucose and other substrates such as nucleosides and nucleotides, are vital for fetal growth and maturation. However, our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological aspects of placenta transport mechanisms and the potential consequences for fetal physiology in diseases of pregnancy is still fragile.

The overall goal of this Satellite Symposium is to explore the nature and wider biological significance of placental endocrine function in adapting maternal physiology during pregnancy to support fetal growth in both normal and compromised environments.

Discussions will cover insights into regulatory epigenetic mechanisms within the placenta, placental structure and vascular/trophoblast function, contribution of the placenta to disease, placental transfer of nutrients and possible translation to the clinic, and potential consequences of human placenta pathophysiological transfer of nutrients for foetus and newborn health.

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